Draft Recommended Network

What is the Transit System Redesign? 

Multimodal Norfolk will include a full redesign of the City’s public transportation system that will evaluate and recommend important policy related to transit funding and stop spacing. The City will examine innovative options to deliver transit service, including micro-transit and other on-demand solutions that will best serve the needs of the City.

Draft Recommended Network

Thank you to the 1,000+ people who responded to the summer surveys!   Based on these responses, the Multimodal Norfolk team has developed a draft recommended transit network! Two-thirds of the survey respondents preferred the ridership concept over the coverage concept. The draft network strikes a balance between the ridership and coverage concept, leaning closer to the ridership concept, and represents feasible service within existing budget constraints.

 The new network would have major benefits for most people in Norfolk:

  • The average resident could reach 10,000 additional jobs by walking and transit in 45 minutes. That’s a 31% increase over the Existing Network.
  • The average minority resident could reach 10,000 additional jobs in 45 minutes, a 32% increase over the Existing Network.
  • The average resident in poverty could reach 12,500 more jobs in 45 minutes, a 39% increase over the Existing Network.
  • For employers and retailers, the number of residents that could reach the average job location would increase by 12,600, a 33% increase over the Existing Network.
  • 140,000 more residents would be within ¼ mile of a bus or train that arrives every 15 minutes for most of the day, 57% more than today.
  • 95,000 more jobs would be within ¼ mile of a bus or train that arrives every 15 minutes for most of the day, 45% more than today.

Since this network reallocates service across the city, these benefits do come with some reductions in service in some parts of the city. Overall, about 8,700 residents would be more than ¼ mile from any transit service, about 4% of city residents. In the Existing Network, about 1% of residents are more than ¼ mile from any transit service.

Read more about the Draft Recommended Network below.  

Existing Network

transit legendNorfolk_Existing Network_20200612 for web Opens in new window 




This is a map of the existing Norfolk transit network.

The color of each line tells you the maximum wait for that bus or train, on a weekday. For example, on a blue line, a bus comes every 30 minutes. On a light blue line, a bus comes only once every 60 minutes.

People are more likely to use frequent service (red lines) because a bus or train is usually coming soon. These lines typically offer better night and weekend service, which makes it easier for people to use the bus for all sorts of activities.

But the only frequent line during midday is The Tide. Most routes come every 30 or 60 minutes during the day on weekdays. Some routes come more frequently during rush hour. For more detail, you can download a larger map or read our Concepts Report (PDF) to learn more about the existing network. 

Draft Recommended Network

8x10Portrait_Norfolk_DraftFinalNetwork_20201116 Opens in new windowtransit legendThis is a map of the Draft Recommended Network for Norfolk.

Compared to the Existing Network, there are far more frequent routes covering many more neighborhoods and key destinations

People are more likely to use frequent service (red lines) because a bus or train is usually coming soon. These lines typically offer better night and weekend service, which makes it easier for people to use the bus for all sorts of activities.

This network includes more frequent service along major corridors like Granby Street, Chesapeake Boulevard, Hampton Boulevard, and Campostella Road.

For more detail, you can download a larger map of the Draft New Network and read our Draft New Network Report (PDF) to learn more about the Draft New Network and its changes compared to the Existing Network.

Downtown Norfolk

A key way that the Draft Recommended Network improves access is by making it easier for transit riders to reach downtown, including places like MacArthur Center, Tidewater Community College, and cultural destinations. The maps below compare the Existing Downtown Network and the Draft Recommended Transit Network. In the Existing Network, few bus routes come into the core of downtown, leaving many transit riders a long walk from major destinations.

Existing Downtown Network Map Opens in new window

Draft Downtown Network Map Opens in new window

The Draft Recommended Network brings more routes through downtown so that transit riders have easier access to all the jobs, shopping, and opportunities available within downtown Norfolk. This makes the many riches of downtown accessible to far more transit riders across the city, and it is part of the reason that 63,000 more residents could reach MacArthur Square by transit and walking in 45 minutes with this new network. That’s an 80% increase in residents who can reach the core of downtown.

The new network also through-routes buses, so that more riders can make trips across the city without having to transfer. For example, someone coming from Norview on the new Route 2 could ride directly through downtown to reach Old Dominion University on Hampton Boulevard. Similarly, someone coming from Campostella and wanting to go to Bon Secours Depaul Medical Center, could ride through downtown without transferring.